Temperature and Tint

When adjusting color in an image you have three tools; Tint and Temperature or RGB Curves.

Temperature and Tint

Think of the Temperature and Tint sliders as the quick and easy method to change color and RGB curves as the precise method.

Temperature slider

Remember on our Color Wheel we said that adding opposites colors gives white light? Cyan and Yellow are opposites.  Dragging it right (higher in temperature) corresponds to a overcast day. It increases the luminance of Red and Green pixels and decreases the luminance of blue pixels. This moves the color in the yellow direction. This is great if your captured pixels were tending to be too blue as in an overcast blue day.

This laid out on your screen first because it makes sense to adjust it first. It is able to fix incandescent or outdoor light color cast issues.

The Kelvin scale is designed to describe the colors metals glow at when their temperatures are raised. Incandescent light bulbs are based on glowing metal. Outdoor light is a combination of yellow sunlight and blue sky. (A side note. If you’ve never cared what light bulbs are called this is a good time to start. They are your paint brushes. Go to a hardware store and stare at them until you understand their names)

LR Temp

Lightroom 4 Temperature Slider when editing a RAW image

ApertureTemp

Aperture 3 Temperature Slider when editing a RAW image

ApertureWarm

Aperture 3 Temperature Slider when editing a JPEG image

Aperture has 3 modes for setting Temperature

Temperature and Tint Mode

  • Used when the reference Kelvin value is important
  • Only mode that allows coarse Cyan to Yellow adjustments

Neutral Grey Mode;

  • Use when you have a neutral grey object in the shot or a reference shot to set the WB.
  • Use to fine tune Cyan to Yellow adjustments.

Skin Tone mode

  • Use when you have a skin tone in the shot to set the WB.
  • Use for fine tune Cyan to Yellow adjustments.

To Remember: If you see cold (magenta) or warm (yellow) casts fix it with the Temperature Slider.

Tint slider

The second slider, adjusts on the Green to Magenta scale. It’s second to temperature (and absent in two Aperture 3 modes) because color casts in this direction are less common. Color casts in this direction occur generally because gas based lights were used or when White Balance is left in AWB and there was a lot of green in the shot.

Gas based lightbulbs can emit nearly any light. Older Fluorescents were known for their green hues.

To Remember: If you see green or pink hues (easiest to see in the hair) slide the Tint slider in the opposite direction.

RGB curves, HSL, Color

Think of these as the precision control for color.

Aperture 3: You get the full power of the histogram at your disposal for color corrections. If you know the Color Wheel and the effect on color by adding or subtracting light then this method is much preferred. It’s also powerful when color casts exist only in certain tones. The histogram is just a line graph for each color. The X-axis is the tone. The number of those pixels in the shoot is the height of that line.

Lightroom 4: Select the color you want and change it’s hue, saturation and luminance. They use the word hue just to use a different word then color. Think of hue as the slider that spins around the color wheel. Think of luminance (brightness) as the slider for moving that color left or right on the histogram. Saturation slide takes the color out from a certain color without changing its luminance.

Slide the red Luminance slider to the right and the red pixels shift right in the histogram

Slide the red Luminance slider to the right and the red pixels shift right in the histogram

Slide the red Luminance slider to left and the red pixels shift left in the histogram

Slide the red Luminance slider to left and the red pixels shift left in the histogram

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